Monday, February 9, 2015

Fabric Printing at Home Blog Tour & Give Away

Many of you know Julie B Booth as being my Roy G Biv partner. Have I ever mentioned that we're old friends from my days in Virginia? That I really and truly know Julie? Have I mentioned that she is a book author as well? Her first book, Fabric Printing at Home, was recently published. To kick off its release, Julie is celebrating with a blog tour of 13 artists whose work appears in the gallery as well as daily give aways.


Fabric Printing at Home is filled with ideas and step-by-step instructions of how to print on fabric using normal kitchen objects. With chapters about Kitchen Textures and Found Object Printing, Beyond the Potato Print, Wrap It Up! Wraps and Foil, Recycled and Repurposed and Irresistible: Fabric Resists Using Kitchen Ingredients, Julie offers something for everyone.

The piece that I contributed to the gallery falls under the found object printing category. When Julie first asked me to participate, I pondered what to use. My collection of wine corks seemed fitting. Now, I think Julie pictured a pattern of dots created by stamping the end of the cork, but 


I inserted toothpicks in the cork ends, rolled it through my inks and paints and then printed on paper.


The cracks in the corks make varied and interesting marks.


Once enough papers were printed, 


I cut and tore, assembled and reassembled,


stitched and repeated steps 1 thru 5

 Cloud Paper Water 1, Jennifer Coyne Qudeen

 until there were 7 pamphlet stitched books. The set is entitled Cloud Paper Water 1, based on Thich Nhat Hanh's Clouds in Each Paper which Sandra Brownlee so intuitively read to me during her Tactile Notebooks and the Written Word workshop at Big Cat Textiles in August 2013.



  Cloud Paper Water 1, Jennifer Coyne Qudeen

Each book contains a word from the poem so cleverly hidden that even I can't find them now and, well, I wrote the words. The cover above appears in the gallery of Fabric Printing at Home

Julie is having a daily give away to celebrate. Stroll on over to her blog and leave a comment for a chance to win. I'm joining in the celebration as well by giving away a copy of Fabric Printing at Home. For a chance to win, just leave a comment on this post by midnight New York city time on February 13. The winner will be announced on Valentine's Day. 

I'm curious...what's the most unusual object you've used to print with?

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 Be sure to visit all the stops on the Tour:
February 2: Lisa Chin

February 3: Lynn Krawczyk
February 4: Jane Davila
  
February 5: Carol R. Eaton
February 6: Judy Gula
February 7: Susan Purney Mark 
February 8: Teri Lucas 
February 9: Jennifer Coyne Qudeen 
February 10: Deborah Boschert 
February 11: Lynda Heines 
February 12: Cheryl Sleboda 
February 13: Terri Stegmiller 
February 14: Jackie Lams




53 comments:

  1. Your cloud paper is beautiful and then beautifully transformed. Love the books and the source of "cloud paper" and Thich Nhat Hanh's words.

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  2. I'm enjoying this series of posts and feeling inspired. Love the cloud paper and the way they are stitched together!

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  3. Thanks for sharing. I certainly have a bunch of corks and can even see carving lines into some of them. Don't know that I have used anything unusual for creating patterns

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  4. What a great idea for adding some texture. I have a collection of corks, so I'll pull some out today and give the technique a try. Thanks.

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  5. Absolutely beautiful! I've used corks but just the ends so this is so clever and toothpicks...a wonderful way to achieve a unique print.

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  6. So simple a tool, yet so many variations ... great inspiration. Thank you!

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  7. I guess the most unusual for me would be my children's hands and feet. Not really that unusual, but I can't think of anything I've used that might trump it! I once saw a documentary about a woman who printed with her breasts, and the prints sold for big bucks! She also had a trainee or two in her studio! Things that make you go, Hmm.

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  8. I recently trashed my accumulated corks. Guess this is an excuse to buy a couple bottles of "good" wine (real cork instead of man-made).

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  9. I love your cork technique - a good excuse to open a bottle of wine ???

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  10. It's snowing again. I thought about using the snow shovel to print with....not a good idea. A cork sounds like much more fun.
    Carole Hoffman

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  11. Interesting results using a found object or rather one you had at hand. The cloud paper water notebooks are very unusual.

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  12. Small tractor or equipment parts

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  13. Tile spacers...as a home renovator, there were always plenty around.

    Irene Peake

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  14. Beautiful! Love the simple color pallet!

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  15. I keep corks, I often wondered why, now I know. These look great.

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  16. I LOVE your cork books. Would you post some more pix of them, please and thank you. :)
    Haven't really used anything that unusual but love your cork idea and now want to try that.

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  17. I got some nice prints from my kids sports shoes but only when I noticed the unusual marks they left when they tracked through mud at the school oval.

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  18. One year when sun printing outside on a windy day, we grabbed some plastic orange hazard fencing and laid it over our fabric to hold it it place. A lovely grid!

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  19. The most unusual thing I ever printed with was a tri-forked twig...as stems for flowers...which were printed with a cut off celery bunch bottom!

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  20. Hi! I wouldn't say that my tools for mark making were unusual (my finger tip and the edge of an old bank card) but I did a 'painting' on a used tea bag with these tools. I love used tea bags. I love making things with them and have not had a lot of spare time to do this as of late. Anyway, here's the visual (link) on flickr. : https://www.flickr.com/photos/19394614@N00/7563076472/
    Thanks for your generous offering for a chance for a nifty giveaway. Norma

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  21. the exterior of an abandoned Home Depot became the site for a series of rubbings, or frottage, last spring, called Home Departed

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  22. Silver metal case, Clinique lipstick, rusty... rolled in black Jacquard opaque paint... rolled randomly across textured Japanese handmade paper... hand stitched, minimal - texture.
    Bethany

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  23. I used a sunflower for printing once. It did not give me quite the detail I was looking for as it was too blobby. I learnt my lesson and now use flower with a finer texture such as coreopsis.

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  24. I haven't really used any unusual tools for printing. I have printed with the ends of a wooden dowel and plastic mesh items of all sorts. I love your cork-printed papers. Thanks for sharing them!

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  25. Your stitched books are spectacular! I printed with a dirty, rusty car part I found in a parking lot! Nothing is scared in my world..lol.. (textilerecycler at yahoo dot com)

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  26. Toilet paper rolls, plastic containers with interesting shapes on the botton, netting from vegetable bags. Never used corks, but have a ton of them. They suddenly have a new use! Am loving the ingeniousness of this blog hop.

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  27. Thanks for the cork concept....I've used a swatch of cotton knitting for some interesting texture with some success. Have to ask what brand of paint you used for your marvelous books...in my favorite color of indigo! Thanks for the inspiration...

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  28. Cording glued to foam core. Not odd, just different for me

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  29. I would love to win a copy of this - I wonder if I can find any corks!

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  30. I have a bag of corks waiting to be used for something! Now I have one way to use them... thanks for the idea. I've used a circular potato masher (at least that's what I think it is) to print

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  31. Hey if a cork works, I wonder if the bag of pine cones I have will also do the trick. Guess I'll just have to try it. thanks for a chance at that wonderful book.

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  32. I made a stamp using bamboo skewers broken and glued to a piece of plywood... not greatly unusual, but it made a nice pattern, especially if I turned each print 90 degrees. Love your cork prints! I don't have any, but will have to find some now...

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  33. Fun idea to use corks in printing! Thanks for the chance to win!

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  34. Wow! Love the cork print and your end result. I wish I could see. It in person. I would love to find the words.

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  35. I love those books! I'm not a very adventurous printer, so far. I'm currently having fun with bubble pack.

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  36. I' ve printed with cooked spaghetti - grabbing a few strands, swiping them through paint and then bouncing them onto fabric. Using two or more colors of paint makes an interesting print. This was a technique I used on paper with my students when I was teaching preschool.

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  37. Nothing too exciting here yet, but hoping to get inspired!

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  38. No unusual printing materials....yet......just homemade stamps and potatoes.
    This book looks very inspirational!

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  39. Most unusual would be the end of a bunch of celery after I cut the stalks off.

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  40. J - beautiful work and great to see the process. B

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  41. I should not have thrown those corks away that I had sitting around! Time to collect some more!

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  42. What a neat idea and....a great excuse to drink some wine! Thanks!

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  43. Your cork-printed paper and books are wonderful! The most unusual thing I've printed with is a grill-cleaning sponge. It had ridges, so made very interesting linear marks.

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  44. Printing with a rolling cork really appeals to me ... I can see it fitting in very well with the random unpredictable images I often like to create. They're great to stitch over!

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  45. I knew I was saving corks for a reason, very kewl. I've used apples, pears and celery bottoms, hardly unusual but pleasing results. Julie's book looks very intriguing.

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  46. Wow - is all I can say - Cloud - Paper - Water - look what you have unleashed in the world of printing!!! Fantastic!!

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  47. Hello Jennifer. I have just been having a really lovely wander back and forth through your blog. Back here to this post now and must say I LOVE your cork rolling drawings. Beautiful marks. x

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  48. Love what you did here, Jennifer!

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  49. Tearing and stitching the paper, just using blue, the title, Thich Nhat Hanhs words, hiding a word, it is all so wonderful. Beautiful work as always.

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  50. Your books are inspiring and help me to learn more, becoming a "wider" looking artist! Most unusual object, edges of school rulers dipped in ink with a class of kindergarteners, assorted plastic lids from perfumes and containers, for embossing soft plastic cake tin liners from the pound store that make a deep grid pattern over a drypoint etching..........now will try corks!!! Thank you again for the creativity!

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