Thursday, March 1, 2018

At a crossroads...of the rusty kind

How do you know when it's time to let go?


How do you know for certain that it is time to move on?


These are a few of the questions that I've been pondering of late - 


most recently this morning as most all of my rusted cottons and organzas 


were transferred from 3 work drawers into 1 storage bin.


Discharged cottons


as well as a few that were eco printed found their way into a second bin.


When visions of pieces yearning to be created flit through my mind, these days they are not of the rusty kind.


So...how do you know when it's time to let go? And just what form does letting go take?

Do I put the bins in the basement where out of sight will equal out of mind, but where they will be accessible if some future day finds me dreaming rusty dreams again?

Or, and this is a bit scary even though it is what my brain says makes the most sense, do I truly let go and offer the lot for sale as yardage? Fat quarters or bags of...bags of what exactly? Bags of rusted cottons? Would it be priced by the piece or pound? Would anyone even want it?

In truth, I feel as if I already have moved on...to tea bags and other scrumptious papers. Did I just answer my own question? Probably. But will I listen to myself? Hmm...

I could really use your help on this one. What do you do with old materials when you move on?

Thanks in advance!



16 comments:

  1. People would buy them...no question..think about time invested to say nothing of the fact that they are generally gorgeous..HOWEVER my hoarder just surfaced...are they good as starting points for further explorations in new directions? I couldn't let them go because they might become something else....of course that's why my son sighs deeply looking at my shelves đŸ˜‚

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Jennifer... well this is a dilemma, and I know the feeling. Stitched collages that are piling up and painted fabrics that are just not speaking to me! Too bad we are not closer - I would do a swap! I can tell you, after fracturing a wrist and now unable to do the great screen printing and yes, rust work I love, I would walk a hundred miles to have a pile of your stash so I could get started working with gorgeous designs like the ones in your "rust bin". Honestly... the artwork you create is such and inspiration and I have been following along for years. So don't give up. Move on and do what is calling to you! And if you decide to bag up some samples bags- I would be honoured to take on a purchase and add some to MY artwork with all due credit!

    ReplyDelete
  3. When I’ve been in that situation, I usually get rid of it....but I would not get rid of your beautiful rusted textiles! I think you’d regret it later.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. (shhh.....let’s just keep this between us...I plan to hold on to my favorites...)

      Delete
  4. I would buy your fabric but probably postage would be prohibitive, I am sure you would have any trouble selling it if you don't want it anymore.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Debbie, I’d rather cover hefty postage in order to send the rusty cotton on to good homes than have them languish away in a bin in the basement. Stay tuned.

      Delete
  5. If I haven't been sure about getting rid of something, I have parceled it up and put it into storage but with a label marked with the date. In a year's time, if I haven't had cause to use the thing or thought about it, then I look at ways of getting rid.

    As to the process of letting go, is there a way to make that meaningful through donations to an art/craft organisation or individual in need of materials? (Having said that, if you were to offer a batch for sale, I would be another one of the people interested in buying!)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think listen to yourself. Do you feel lighter keeping it, or has it been used within the last year?

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm actually thinking of getting rid finished pieces. I spent a lot of time and energy creating them, but have moved on to a different way of creating and a different look. I feel the old ones don't represent who I am. If I hand them over to friends and family as gifts, they might not be appreciated because the recipient might not be crazy about them. So I'm going to see if I can cut them up into smaller pieces of art, and just leave them in places like a retirement home, the library, businesses, etc. with a note that says something like... "if you like this, it is yours and was made for you. Take it and enjoy it. If not, leave it for someone else."

    ReplyDelete
  8. it gets put away and forgotten until someday it, somehow, disappears. knowing when it's done is good!

    ReplyDelete
  9. It's time to let go when the thought of working with the materials or technique no longer excites you...reason why I haven't made a doll in years! I say...if there are some pieces that call to you...keep those for a while. Let the others go out into the world to inspire new work!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I think you have answered your own question....when you first raised the thought in your mind, it sounds like you were ready to move on from rusty markings.
    Although all that time & effort ~ the beauty of your creations....like saying goodbye to an old friend.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I sense you are at a crossroads Jennifer - having worked for so long with rust and all the exquisite marking you are able to achieve. And then what you do with those pieces of fabric - wow. You have been on a journey and now thinking about a completely new direction? It is a very brave thing to put aside what has been delighting you - exciting but a little scary at the same time. I would suggest boxing all your bits for the moment as a time may come when you need to re explore that arena. A step back to help you move forward occasionally. I have had loads of problems in my mind letting go of printmaking .... almost threw my 'stuff' away but boxed it instead. Am thrilled I did because every now and then I still dabble and have such fun. So think a little more before you leap/throw/sell. Sooooo much delicious stuff there :-)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Because I've come to all these artistic delights comparatively late in life, keeping stuff doesn't represent so much of a problem for me. I haven't accumulated a life time's worth of stuff. As many have said here, in your shoes, if a clear out is necessary, I'd keep what you really like, some of what you quite like or which represents progress for you and get rid of the rest. But really, I'm a fine one to advise - I find it almost impossible to get rid of anything I've produced - even if all the work does is represent endeavour in a 'keeping a diary' kind of way. The only things I jettison are those that give me no continued pleasure or satisfaction on any level. Getting rid of those is very therapeutic.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I'm disappointed to know I won't be able to 'tune in' here and see yet another of your brilliant rusty gems but . . . your creative journey is more important than my cloth voyeurism. So, what will you decide? I, for one, would love the opportunity to purchase any discards.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...